Did not such strong connections draw me elsewhere, I believe Scotland would be the Country I should chuse to spend the Remainder of my Days in.

Benjamin Franklin, on visiting Edinburgh


The projects we work on, current and completed, are all designed to celebrate and promote Edinburgh's literature, and to inspire an interest in books, words and reading.


Literary Salon Evenings

On the last Tuesday of the month, the City of Literature Trust gathers together literary folk for a few drinks and the chance for a chat in convivial and informal surroundings. 

We meet every month, excluding August and December, from 6pm at The Wash Bar on the Mound in central Edinburgh - click here for a map.  It's a low-key evening with some brief words of wisdom on the topic of the evening, but best of all it's a good opportunity to meet like-minded people.

If you have a professional interest in literature, come and join the authors, journalists, literary agents, publishers, booksellers, librarians and many more who meet up at these regular events.

If you think you'd like to come along and join us, then just drop by the bar on the last Tuesday. You can sign up for a reminder about the Salon and a weekly listing of literary goings-on here.

Facts and Figures

City of Literature Trust began these salons in September 2005 as a way of bringing together the individuals that make up Edinburgh's literary sector, to strengthen the sense of community.  Over 100 people attended our opening night, and now we welcome about 40 - 60 people over the course of each evening.

‘I really enjoyed the salon evening the other night. I have a bit of an underlying ambition to do a bit of creative writing myself, so great to be around so many inspirational writers.’


'I first turned up at one of the salon events as a nervous unpublished author back in the day, not really knowing what to expect and feeling like I shouldn’t really be there, but everyone were so nice to me that I soon forgot about that and just joined in. Both Ali and Anna are really terrific in terms of making people feel welcome and encouraging writers to have the confidence to get out there, meet people, apply for stuff and all those aspects that can seem very daunting when you’re a new writer who doesn’t really know what you’re doing.' - Rosy Barnes
 

Background on Salons

Salons have a fine literary tradition, from the Paris cafe meetings which brought together philosophers, writers and poets, to publisher John Murray’s famous ‘Four o'clock friends’ gathering, where he had afternoon tea each day with his writers.

Robert Burns came to Edinburgh in 1786 and took its literary salons by storm, meeting Sir Walter Scott who was then just fifteen, and leaving a lasting impression: ‘There was a strong expression of sense and shrewdness in all his lineaments: the eye alone, I think, indicated the poetical character and temperament. It was large, and of a cast which glowed (I say literally glowed)’

 

Salons Around Scotland

The Highland Literary Salon, based on the successes of similar gatherings in Edinburgh and Glasgow, brings together those with an interest in literature to discuss writing, ideas, projects, publishing, and all things literary. The Salon will on the third Tuesday of each month at Maverick's, Young Street, Inverness. Dates include 17th November 2009, 15th December 2009, 19th January 2010, 16th February 2010, 16th March, 20th April 2010.

Visit www.highlandlitsalon.com or contact info@highlandlitsalon.com.

 

Weegie Wednesday was inspired by the Edinburgh salon evenings to provide a monthly gathering for the literary community in the West of Scotland.  Taking place on the middle Wednsday of the month, the event often features guest speakers and takes place in the Terrace Bar in the CCA, Sauchiehall Street from 7.30pm.

Visit weegiewednesday.org for more information.